(Research):http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=msdargo100&id=I5086

Shared note

(Research):http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=msdargo100&id=I5086

http://gw4.geneanet.org/monartque?lang=de;p=antoine;n=boutin+dit+laplante

Poitiers, capital of Poitou, one of the most important cities in la Gaule, became the capitol of the department of la Vienne during the French Revolution. Ancestor Antoine Boutin was born within the boundaries of this territory, in a community called Vernon, at the crossroads of Fleure and St-Maurice-la-Clouere, Gizay and Dienne, inland and amid forests. Vernon now belongs to the canton of La-Villedieu-du-Clain. According to our Canadian information, Antoine Boutin was born about 1642. His father was named Jean and his mother Georgette Bonneau, according to registries in France. Our notaries' quills also wrote Georgette Reimbaut or Peimbaut. From the beginning of New France until 1662, demographic researchers agree with one another that the colony had a total of about 2,357 adult immigrants. Of this number, only 549 had a definite contract of indenture, according to historian Marcel Trudel. That was certainly not very many. The reason was that this colony, clinging to the edge of the Saint-Lawrence, had such a need for new workers that the names of new arrivals were simply not registered in the rush to get them on the land. Any precise information concerning the departure from France and the arrival in Canada of Antoine Boutin is lacking. What can we deduce from the only fact we have - that Antoine was a drummer in the garrison of Chateau Saint-Louis at Quebec? Did this musician of the drumsticks come here as a soldier in uniform? Probably. In his marriage contract signed in 1665, we note the presence of a witness, a soldier from Fort Saint-Louis, the Sieur de la Gimondiere. Pierre Dubois Davaugour appeared at Quebec, to be Governor of New France, on 31 August 1661. He brought one hundred soldiers with him. What a surprise he received! Barely arrived, the new leader realized that one hundred soldiers were too few for the work to be accomplished and too many to be fed. On the autumn day of 13 October, Davaugour spoke straight out to the Grand Conde: "if, knowing all this, the King does not intervene for the men of country and send me my bread and that for my hundred soldiers whom I have brought with me, I will have the honor..." The list of these brave men has not been found. Would it be too daring to state that Antoine Boutin was part of this contingent of would be fighters?...Perhaps his ultimatum to the King had been better left unwritten because Davaugour was returned to France in the summer of 1663. On March 23, 1664, we are certain that the 22 year old Antoine Boutin, was really at Quebec because he was confirmed there by Msgr Francois de Laval with 101 other men and women. On May 26, 1665, just before the beginning of summer, Antoine Boutin made a decision, the consequences of which are still with us today. He was going to start a home with Genevieve Gandin, a native flower. Her Father Barthelemi had contracted at La Rochelle on June 5, 1643, to come to Canada as a cooper for Guillaume Couillard. Looking back, we note that on January 20, 1647, Marthe Cognac, originally from the town of Marans, was joined in bonds of matrimony to Barthelemi Gandin at La Rochelle. Their eldest daughter Genevieve was baptized at Quebec on January 30, 1649. At the ceremony was godfather Guillaume Couture, godmother Genevieve Bourdon, and the Jesuit priest Joseph-Imbert Duperon, officiating. Genevieve grew up in the capital of the colony and, what is more, she knew how to write her name. On this afternoon, Antoine went to the house of his prospective father-in-law, where his beloved and notary Fillion were waiting. Some of the most important people of the country surrounded the lovebirds: Governor de Mezy, Jacques Leneuf de La Poterie, Rene-Louis Chartier, Sieure de Lotbiniere, Guillaume Couture, Vincent Poirier dit Bellepoire, Louis de Battanville, Charles Danet, Jacqueline Roulois, etc. Barthelemi Gandin and Marguerite Cognac took advantage of this opportunity to endow the new couple with half of their land at Coulonges and half of their fish catch and outbuildings. The future couple would be "one and joint in all property". Sixteen signatures were placed on the legal paper imported from France. The religious blessing at Sillery only took place on Tuesday, November 3, 1665, in the presence of Father Henri Nouvel, at the same time as the wedding of Pierre Cochereau and Marie Vaublin. The two acts were recorded at the cathedral of Notre-Dame de Quebec. On the occasion of his nuptials, Antoine Boutin received a piece of land from his in-laws, on the coast of St-Francois-Xavier, near Sillery. For two or three years, the young Boutin family had a home, thanks to this wedding gift. In the census of 1666 and 1667 we may note that the neighbors of the young couple were Sebastien Gingras and Jacques Fournier, Sieur de LaVille. Antoine already owned apiece of land measuring ten arpents square in the community of Quebec, near the Saint-Charles River. Governor Davaugour gave it to him probably in 1662. Bordering this property was that of Simon Denys to the north-west, Mathieu Hubou dit Deslongschamps and Abraham Martin to the north-east, and th the south-west was the property of the widow Legardeur de Repentigny. On April 16, 1665, Antoine Boutin sold this spread to Vincent Poirier for 90 livres. The latter resold it to the Jesuits on July 21, 1667 for 250 livres. The Boutins did not stay very long in the territory of Sillery. On March 20, 1667, Antoine was persuaded to move to the seigneury of Dombourg, today Neuville, by the proprietor, seigneur Francois Bourdon. At the same time, forty-three other concessionaires agreed to the same terms and the same obligations. Unfortunately, all of these deeds have been lost, but the local parish census of October 8, 1668 mentions Antoine Boutin as a censitaire of this locality. The Boutin concession consisted of two arpents and one perche of frontage at high tide on the River Saint-Lawrence, by forty arpents deep. On May 30, 1672, seigneur Bourdon had another document drawn up, covering the same grant, and placed it in Boutin's hands. Deveral new and rather restrictive conditions were set forth, for example, the landowner could fish in front of his residence only if he agreed to give one-thirtieth of all fish caught to his seigneur. Pierre Piche dit Lamusette and Jean Maheu signed as witnesses. A few censitaires were not at all happy with these new documents which they considered superfluous and unduly confining. Francois and Jean Garnier, Antoine Tapin, Claude Carpentier, Louis Delisle and Antoine Boutin did not want to pay the six livres in fees due the notary. The Sovereign Council was informed of this resistance. The defendants claimed that they did not have to pay for these contracts which were in all points similar to the first ones, received in 1667. After seemingly endless litigation, the judgment of 23 September 1674 was confirmed by the highest judiciary uathority of the land, on Monday, 25 April 1678. The appellants were ordered to "take away from the said Rageot the expenses of their contracts of concession and to pay him for those which he provides them or will provide them". Antoine Boutin escaped with the honors of war, since by 1678 he had left Dombourg for a world where human justice is replaced by blissful life. On January 10, 1676, Antoine Boutin and the edgetool maker Pierre Bouvier, promised nobleman Claude Charron, through the intervention of his son Francois, 10,000 wodden poles of "inferior ash suitable to make coarse barrel hoops nine to ten feet long in proportionate and reasonable thickness". The lot had to be delivered on the Saint-Charles River by the following June 15th. The promised wage for this work amounted to 165 livres. Did Antoine have the time to fulfill his commitments? We can not say with certaintly. One can only live fully by lliving for others. The Boutins passed on life to five children, three sons and two daughters: Jean-Baptiste, Genevieve, Louis, Marie-Francoise, and Guillaume. Antoine Boutin died prematurely in 1676. His death certificate has not been located. This humble, honest, and hardworking ancestor was about thirty-four years old when he left his loved ones. He was much too young to die. Genevieve Gandin was forced to reorganize her life. She made the acquaintance of the twenty-two year old Jean Beland. This young man came from Saint-Eloi in France, where his father was a messenger between Rouen and Le Harve. The ancestor of the Belands, who had arrived two years earlier, was not frightened off by the children of Antoine Boutin. Obviously he was emboldened by the charms of the worldy wise widow! After a marriage contract signed on July 18, 1677, Genevieve and Jean appeared before a traveling missionary to have their union blessed. History's little details have left us nothing precise. The marriage agreement reveals that the couple put all their property in common usage. The Boutin farm, situated between those of Pierre Bouvier and Louis Delisle, had "an old shed, a small cottage and about eight arpents under cultivation by bothe plow and pickaxe". The five Boutin children would be fed, raised and educated according to their abiltiy, until the age of fifteen. Bailiff Guillaume Roger and shoemaker Jacques Emond placed their signatures as witnesses before that of notary Becquet. Jean Beland signed with the flourish of a cultured gentleman. The new family increased at Neuville with the arrival of at least six well-identified children. On July 17, 1709, Madame Beland made a gift to her son Jean Beland of what she possessed, on the condition that the latter feed and support his parents, both in good health and in sickness, until their deaths. The ancestress of the Boutins and the Belands was buried in the consecrated land of Neuville (Portneuf), on Tuesday, 4 December 1726. Curate Robert Dumont officiated at the funeral. Genevieve was 76 years old and very worthy. Jean Beland went to join her on March 8, 1731. The ancestral land remained in the hands of Beland owners until 1811. You can find this property as lot number 57 on the present day survey map. It was owned by Paul Noreau until 1958.

Given names Surname Sosa Birth Place Death Age Place Last change
Antoine Boutin
1642
378 St. Christophe, Vernon, Poitou, France
4 July 18, 1677
343 35 Neuville, Portneuf Co., Quebec, Canada
Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:52 AM
Given names Surname Age Given names Surname Age Marriage Place Last change
Media objects
Media Title Individuals Families Sources Last change
Sources
Title Abbreviation Author Publication Individuals Families Media objects Shared notes Last change