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http://www.ourancestry.org/b23.htm#P125

http://worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=jjswbs&id=I01771

Immigration: ABT 1709 Pennsylvania

http://www.geni.com/people/Gerhart-Clemens/6000000002576892798

Clemens is a Mennonite family name which appears in the early Palatine Mennonite census list. The list indicates that as early as 1664 a person named Jan Clamens was living at Niederflorsheim. In 1672 Johann Clemeintz as deacon signed a letter of appeal sent to the Amsterdam Mennonites. In 1685 he is listed as still living as an old man at the same place. The first member of the family to come to North America was Gerhardt Clemens, who was probably born in 1680, accompanied by his wife, Anneli Hiestand Reiff and two sons, Johannes and Jacob. Annalie 'Anna" was the daughter of Michael Rÿff and Kungold 'Kinget' Hiestand, stepdaughter of Johannes Stauffer. Johannes and Kungold Stauffer also accompanied Gerhart on his trip to North America. He left the Palatinate and arrived in Pennsylvania in 1709, settling in Skippack, Montgomery Co., Pa. Some of his descendants moved to adjacent Chester County. In 1809 othersr of his descendants, Abraham Lederach Clemens, cousins Abraham Carlisle and George Carlisle migrated to Waterloo Twp., Ont., where a number of descendants continued to live. Several of these Canadian Clemenses moved to the Kent County, Michigan. area.

GERHART CLEMENS Gerhart is included in "Lists of Germans from the Palatinate who came to England in 1709" as follows: "A list of all the poor Germans lately come over from the Palatinate to this kingdom taken in St. Catherine's the sixth May 1709." "First Arrivals" Clemens, Gerhard , age 28; married and wife living; son age 5, son age 1 1/2; the family belonged to the Baptist Church. Listed under occupation "husbandmen, weaver and vinedressers" Emigrated fro th alatinate on the Rhine 170 arriving in New Yor 1709, probably March. A bil of goods was purchased fro hi rother Joh an as recorded as settled in New York, March 8. 170 ( ood indication tha he had a brother, John, who was already settled in America.) Fro Ne ork, Gerhardt and family moved on to Germantown, Philadelphia 10 Oct 1709. A warrant granted Sept. 10, 171 to David Powell, of Philadelphia, for 300 acres of land, to be located between the ' Skepeck" and 'Parkyooman'. ...and fro it 690 acres, located on the Northeast Branch, wer sold to Gerhart Clemens on February 14th. 1718." He built his homestead on the west side of the Perkiomen stream, later building a larger home on the east side of the Perkiomen. By April 1734 he owned 690 acres of land. To help pay for the land, Gerhart and some of his children wove homespun goods for their friends and neighbours. From Gerharts Account book: " Anno 1726, March 13. I made a piece of cloth, altogether 30 yards,9 yards of tow and 21 yards of flax for Jacob Garman. John Lederach's flaxen cloth is 36 yards at 6 pence a yard. the piece of tow cloth which I made is 15 yards and a half at 5 pence a yard. For Paul Friet I made a piece of flaxen cloth. it is 23 yards at 5 pence a yard." After 1741 there are no enteries in the account book in his hand writing. Another enterprise of Gerhart and family was the building of the first grist mill in Salford Twp. on the Perkiomen Creek in 1726. The mill stood until 1823 and was situated against a hill, two stories high in the front, and one in the rear. A mirrorwith a painting of this mill is stored at the Doon Heritage Center, Waterloo County. Further reference to Gerhart (Pg 460 Strass.) "..Hans Wegley seller of a mare and colt to Gerhart Clemens on the 15th day of November 1723..." Gerhart around the age of 60 seems to have retired from the business life. Between 1736 and 1741 there are several accounts of his transferring land deeds to his sons and sons-in-law." Sold 50 acres of land along the Parkeawming Creek to Michael Zieger." Same source as Migration, Page 13 Sometime after the first settlers had established themselves along Skippack creek, and began to feel at home there, they saw necessity of having a central public higway leading to Philadelphia that would answer better than the rough, crooked, winding paths through the forrests, around some clear feilds, and in places through almost impassible swamps and streams. By the year 1713 quite a number of people ownded land [about 30] along the Skippack, of whom some where settlers and others, intending to live there at some time, also took an interest in having the road. Accordingly, a petition was drawn up and presented to the County of Quarter Sessions held in Philadelphia June 2, 1713. It contained a large number of signers, as will be seen, and evidently must have attracted a good deal of attention at that time, for the signers were widely scattered, and nearly all were interested in the road. The following is the petition: " The Petition of the inhabitants of the township of Skippack and several ajacent plantations in said county, humbly showeth, that whereas, in the aforesaid township and neighborhood thereof, pretty many families are already settled , and probably not a few more to settle in and about the same. And yet no road being laid out and established to accomodate your petitioners: but what paths have hitherto been used are only upon sufferance, and liable to be fenced up. Therefore, your petinioners, both for the public good and their own convenience, humbly desire an order for the laying out and establishing a road or cartway from the upper end of said township down to the wide-marsh, of Farmer's Mill, which will greatly tend to the satisfaction of your petitioners, who shall thankfully asknowledge ther favor, &c.' (sic) The following names are the names of the signers----- Dirk RENBERG, Jacob KOLB, Daniel DESMOND Heinrich FREY, William RENBERG Peter DUNN Gerhard In den Hoffen, (sic) Hermanus KUSTER, Thomas KENWORTHY, Claus JANSON, Martin KOLB, Peter BELLAR, Gerhard CLEMENS, Johannes SCHOLL, Peter WENTZ, Heinrich PANNEPACKER, Heinrich KOLB, Abraham LeFever, Johanes UMSTAT, Jacob OpDenGraeff, Jan KREY, Johannes KOLB, Peter SELLEN, Andrew SCHRAEGER, Jacob GAETSHLACK (sic), Herman In den HOFFEN, Lorentz SCHWEITZER, Mathias TYSON, John NEWBERRY, James BEEN Pennsylvania Archives, 1664-1747, Page 213. Petition of the Inhabitants of Colebrookdale: "To His Excellency Patrick Gordon Esqr., Governor Generall in Chief over the Province of pencilvania, and the Territoris thereunto Belonging, Benbrenors township and the Adjacences Beloinging May ye 10th 1728. We think It fit to address your Excellency for Relief, for your Excellency must knowe That we have Suffered and is like to sufer By the Ingians, they have fell upon ye Back Inhabitors about falkners Swamp, & near Coshapopin. Therefore, we the humbel Petitioners, With our poor Wives & Children Do humbly Beg of your Excellency To Take It into Consideration and Relieve us the Petitioners hereof, Whos Lives Lies At Stake With us and our poor Wives & Children that is more to us than Life. Therefore, We the humble Petitioners hereof, Do Desire An Answer from your Excellency by ye Bearer With Speed, so no more at present from your poor afflicted People Whose names are here Subscribed. " The following names are on the document, although many are in the same handwriting: John Roberts, Jn. Pawling, Henry Pannebeckers, W. Lane, John Jacobs, _______ D. Bais, Israell Morris, Benjamine fry, Jacob opdengraef, Richard Adams, George Poger, Adam Sollom, Dirtman KOLB, Gabriel Showler, Anthony Halmon, John Isaac Rlein, Hanss Detweiler, William Bitts, Heinrich Rutt, Hubburt Castle, Henry Rentlinger, Christian WEBER, Gerhart de hesse, Lorentz Cinzamore, Richard Jacob, Herman Rubert, Peter Bun, Jacob Cugnred, Christian Nighswanger, Conrad Cresson, Jacob Kolb, Hans Wolly Borgy, John Mier, Henrich Kolb, John Frot, Paul Frot, Wm. Smith, Peter Rambo, David Young, Christopher Schmit, Garrett CLEMENS, Mathias Tyson, Peter Johnson, Yost Hyt, Christian Aliback, Hans RIFE, Daniel Stowfard, Abraham Schwartz, Johann Valentine Kratz, John Johnson, Ulrich Heffelfinger, Nicholas Haldeman, Michael ZIEGLER, Christian STONER, Johannes Garber, John Haldeman, Claus Jansen, Nicholas Hicks, Johannes Leisher, Jacob Sheimer, Michael Krause, Peter REIFF, George REIFF, George Meyer, Bastian Smith, Edward In de Hoffen, Christian Kroll, Jacob Grater, Jacob Stauffer, Henry Stauffer, and Paul Friedt Jr. The following is from The Strassburger Family and Allied Families of Pennsylvania, by Ralph Beaver Strassburger, 1922, pp. 454-475. THE CLEMENS FAMILY: "Gerhart Clemens, a Mennonite, born 1680, probably in Switzerland, was the son of Jacob Clemens and came to Pennsylvania in 1709, settling first in Skippack, where in 1711 he purchased of Matthias Van Bebber a farm of one hundred acres. Matthias Van Bebber had received from the Proprietary, William Penn, six thousand acres of land situated in what was then Philadelphia, but now Montgomery County. This great tract was known as Bebber's Township and comprised all of the present Perkiomen and Skippack Township. In 1718 Gerhart Clemens purchased of David Powell another tract of land consisting of three hundred acres "on the northeast branch of the Perkahomy Creek," in what is now Lower Salford Township. Here upon the west side of the creek he built a log house, where he lived while he cleared away the forests. On December 9, 1722, Gerhart and his wife Ann sold to Michael Ziegler, one of the earliest ministers of the Mennonite Church at Skippack, fifty acres of his first purchase of one hundred acres in Bebber's or Skippack Township. Thereafter, by purchase and patent, he acquired additional tracts until he had six hundred and ninety acres which he claimed as his own. Gerhart Clemens kept a diary, or notebook, in which are entered many notes, none, however, in his own handwriting after 1740. While there are entries made in the same book later on, they appear to have been made by his son, Jacob, with whom, according to tradition, he lived during the latter years of his life. Gerhart Clemens says in his diary that he was born in 1680 and came to Pennsylvania in 1709. From the following entry we learn that his father's name was Jacob: "Anno 1709, March 8, I, Jacob Clemens, gave my son Gerhart by my own hand on account 126 guilders." Then the following: "Anno 1709, March 3, I, John Clemens, have settled with my brother Gerhart Clemens and made every thing balance regarding his purchased goods." According to tradition, this brother, John, was a merchant, unmarried in the city of New York. It is also said that there was another brother, Jacob, who lived in Chester County, Pennsylvania. Another item of interest in this notebook, no date, but apparently made in Holland: "My father-in-law reckoned to me for the horse ( ) rix dollars and for the cow 12 rix dollars. Is that now right?" This was formerly the money of Holland. Two and a half guilders made one rix dollar, which was equal to one dollar United States money. The diary is written entirely in German, but the fact that all his financial dealings were transacted in the currency then in use in Holland leads one to believe that Gerhart Clemens was living in or near that country. About March 1709, when he was twenty-nine years of age, he apparently sold his possessions to his father, Jacob, and his brother, John, and to his father-in-law, whose name, unfortunately, he neglects to give us, and prepares to come to this country. From this same notebook we learn that by October of that year he had arrived in Pennsylvania. By 1735 Gerhart Clemens' entire tract comprised about a mile square, and among the adjoining land owners are noted Andrew Lederach and Dillman Kolb. It was not long before Gerhart Clemens became one of the most prosperous and successful men in the community. He lived for some time in his first house built on the west side of the Branch Creek, but later erected a larger and more commodious residence on the east side of the same stream. We learn from the numerous accounts that appear in his diary, or notebook, that Gerhart Clemens and some of his children were weavers and wove considerable homespun goods for his friends and others. This was, no doubt, one of the ways by means of which they made money to pay their debts. In 1726, Gerhart Clemens built the first grist mill in Salford Township on the creek near the present (1922) site of Groff's mill. In the diary he left some matters on record relating to it, namely, that he made a contract with Jacob Souder, March, 1726, to build a mill "to be well made and to give good satisfaction," for which he was to receive 33 pounds, one half thereof to be paid when the mill was finished and the other half in six months afterwards. This mill stood until 1823, nearly 100 years, when the foundation for the present (1922) mill, now known as Groff's, was laid. Part of the foundation of the old mill is easily discernible. The original building stood against the hill, about one hundred and fifty yards farther up the stream from the present site. "It was built in the most economical manner, two stories high. There were no elevators in it, everything which was to be ground twice had to be carried up stairs to the second story. Customers bringing in grists there to be ground drove their teams up hill and unloaded on the second story, while those who fetched their grists, which mostly consisted of flour and bran, received them from the first floor." Two years after the first mill was built the Goshenhoppen road was opened, which added greatly to the convenience of the neighborhood. It crossed the stream just below the mill. On September 26, 1738, Gerhart Clemens and his wife, Ann, conveyed to their son, John, the mill, the residence, and one hundred fifty-one acres thereunto belonging. On June 20, 1738, they gave to their son Jacob two tracts containing together one hundred and eight-five acres. On the following day, June 21, Gerhart and his wife transferred to their son Jacob another large tract containing one hundred and thirty-six acres. Then on May 30, 1741, Gerhart Clemens and his wife sold to their son, Abraham, two hundred and thirty-six acres of his vast holdings, four acres of which the latter sold ten days later to his brother Jacob. The remainder of this land, Gerhart Clemens sold to various persons, in all about eight hundred and twenty-four acres. After disposing of all his land it appears Gerhart and his wife retired, though he was only sixty-one years old at that time. He died about 1744-45, when he was about sixty-five years of age. There is nothing to be found in the records of Philadelphia concerning the settlement of his estate. Apparently he had prepared himself for the event of his death by his disposition of all his property. He and his wife, Ann, who he married in Holland, and whose surname is unknown [*It has since been ascertained that Ann's maiden name was Anneli Reiff.], are both buried at the Lower Salford Meeting House, but no stones are standing to mark their graves. Note July 2002: A grave marker, located Salford Mennonite Cemetery, Groff Mill Road, Salford, Montgomery Co., PA. reads: " Pioneer of the Clemens Family / First Generation / Gerhart Clemens 1680-1745 / Ann Clemens / Emigrated 1709 / Second Generation / John Clemens 1707 /Elizabeth Clemens /Anna (Clemens) Kratz 1793 / Jacob Clemens 1787 / Abraham Clemens 1776 / Valentine Kratz 1793 / Barbara Clemens / Catherine Clemens" Stone beside Gerharts marker: " 1707 John Kratz 1780 / Progenitor of the Kratz Family in America / Migrated from the Palatine 1727 / Married Ann Clemens / Daughter of Gerhart Clemens / Lived Lower Salford. It is probable that Ann died first, as tradition says that Gerhart made his home during the latter years of his life with his son Jacob, for whom he had built the substantial stone house still standing, though many improvements and additions have been added to the original. Note re ancestry of Gerhart Clemens from Elaine Jeter, 2001: "The immigrant Gerhardt Clemens was born in the village of Niederfloersheim, near Alzey, in the Pfalz in abt. 1680. This Mennonite Clemens family appears on the Taufer (anabaptist) censuses of the early 1660's--these censuses were taken to identify anabaptists, for the purpose of extra taxation and/or expulsion from the area. That's what happened in those days when a Protestant ruler died and a Catholic one took over. The same family is found before that in the 1650's in the Siebengebirge area, (n. of Mannheim) in a similar census; they were expelled from there after that 1650's census. Because of the languages used by Gerhardt Clemens, immigrant, and the name forms found in the taufer censuses, it seems most probable that this family was among those driven from the "low countries" during the 90-year Dutch/Spanish war that ended in 1645. Like all Mennonites, the Clemens family was never allowed to hold any citizenship in any country in Europe, and they emigrated up and down the Rhine River in order to try to find a place where they would have the freedom to think for themselves and to practice their own faith." 1734, Landholders of Pennsylvania County, 1734 (Genalogical Society of Pennsylvania, Miscellany #2) Listed as owning 150 acres. Memorial Stone, Salford Mennonite Cemetery, Montgomery Co. PA. Tombstone Inscription: Pioneers of the Clemens Family / First Generation / Gerhart Clemens 1685 - 1745 and Ann Clemens / Emigrated 1709 / Second Generation / John Clemens 1707 & Elizabeth Clemens / Anna Clemens Kratz 1793 & Valentine Kratz 1709 - 1780 / Jacob Clemens 1782 & Barbara Clemens / Abraham Clemens 1776 & Catherine Clemens1782 & Barbara Clemens / Abraham Clemens 1776 & Catherine Clemens -------------------- Emigrated to America in 1709. He settled first in Skippack, where in 1711, he purchased of Matthias van Bebber, a farm of one hundred acres. Matthias van Bebber had received of the Proprietary, William Penn, six thousand acres of land in what was then Philadelphia, but now Montgomery County. In 1718, Gerhart Clemens purchased of David Powel another tract of land consisting of three hundred acres on the "northeast branch of the Perkiomen" in what is now Lower Salford Township. Here upon the west side of the creek he built a log cabin, where he lived while he cleared away the forests. Thereafter, by purchase and patent he acquired additional tracts until he had six hundred and ninety acres. Gerhart Clemens kept a diary, or notebook, in which are entered many notes, none, however, in his own handwriting after 1740. While there are entries made in the same book later on, they appear to have been made by his son, Jacob, with whom, according to tradition, he lived during the latter years of his life. (This diary later was in the possession of Abraham K. Cassel, the antiquarian, and now probably in the Juniata College Library, Huntington, Pa.) Gerhart Clemens says in his diary that he was born in 1680 and came to America in 1709. From the following entry we learn that his father's name was Jacob: "Anno 1709, March 8, I, Jacob Clemens, gave my son, Gerhart, by my own hand on account 1 26 guilders. Anno 1709, March 3, I, John Clemens, have settled with my brother. Gerhart Clemens, and made everything balance regarding his purchased goods." According to tradition, his brother John was a merchant, unmarried, in the city of New York. It is also said that there was another brother, Jacob, who lived in Chester County, Pennsylvania. We learn from numerous accounts that appear in the diary, or notebook, that Gerhart Clemens and some of his children were weavers and wove considerable homespun goods for his friends and others. This was no doubt one of the ways by means of which they made money to pay their debts. In 1726 Gerhart Clemens built the first grist mill in Salford Township on the creek near the present site of Groffs Mill, later Landis' ice house. This mill stood until 1823, nearly 100 years, when the foundation for the present mill was laid. Part of the foundation of the old mill is easily discernible. He built a residence on this property, which together with 151 acres of land was conveyed to his son, John. On June 20, 1738 they gave to their son, Jacob, two tracts containing 185 acres (facsimile of deeds in Strassberger's book.) This is the present (1948) Elias Landis home. After disposing of all his land it appears Gerhart Clemens and his wife retired, though he was only sixty one years old at the time. There is nothing to be found on record in Philadelphia concerning the settlement of his estate. Apparently he had prepared himself for the event of his death by the disposition of all his property. He died about 1744-45. His wife Ann, whom he married in Holland, and he are both buried in the Salford cemetery but the graves are unmarked now. Tradition says she died first and he lived with his son, Jacob, whose home he built. Part of this house is still (1948) standing at the Landis home.

  • buried Salford Menn Cem -------------------- Birth: 1680 Death: ABT 1744 Burial: Salford Mennonite Cemetery Married: Aug 1702 -------------------- 1. GERHART CLEMENS was born in 1680/1681 in Dittelshiem, Germany. He died about 1745 in Skippack, Montgomery Co. Pa. U.S.A.. He was buried in Lower Salford Mennonite Cemetery, PA, U.S.A.. GERHART married ANNELI 'ANNA' (HIESTAND) REIFF in Aug 1702 in [Weissenan], [Mainz], Baden, Germeny. ANNELI was born in 1680/1682 in Mettenheim, near Ibersteim, Germany. She died in 1745 in Lower Salford, Pa. U.S.A.. She was buried in 1745 in Lower Salford Mennonite Cemetery, PA, U.S.A.. "Reiff to Riffe Families in America", Pg 26: In 1709, the Clemens family were part of the Ibersheim Congregation that lived on Farm 2 at Dittelsheim. The family is listed as Gerhart Clemens, age 29; Anna Clemens, age 27; Jacob Clemens age 5; and Abraham Clemens, age 2. His parents lived on Farm 1 and were listed as Jacob Clemens, age 59, and wife. Accompanied by Anna's step father, Hans Stauffer and family the Clemenses left their home in November 5, 1709 and after a three day journey embarked at Weissenau on the Rhine. After about 10 weeks of travel they arrived in London, England on January 26 1709. They sailed on the "Marie Hope" and after 67 at sea they reached Pennsylvania". (other info in between) They had the following children:
  • 2 M i Jacob ( Reiff) Clemens
  • 3 M ii Johannes 'John' (Reiff) Clemens
  • 4 M iii ABRAHAM (REIFF) CLEMENS
  • 5 F iv Catherine (Reiff) Clemens
  • 6 F v Anna ( Reiff) Clemens
  • 7 F vi Mary (Reiff) Clemens
Given names Surname Sosa Birth Place Death Age Place Last change
Gerhart Clemens
1680
340 Dittelshiem, Germany
1 about 1745
275 65 Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania, USA
Monday, October 31, 2011 11:17 AM
Given names Surname Age Given names Surname Age Marriage Place Last change
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